Blog

The life cycle of a circular economy product

We have probably all heard at some point about production chains and their processes, how a product follows a path from its manufacture to its consumption and completion. It is also common to be aware that products that are launched on the market have a pre-established expiry date and that things seem to last less and less. In relation to this, many companies and multinationals have become aware of the danger of an unlimited production approach without sustainable measures, as it affects not only the environment, but also our lives.

It is for this reason that the concept of circular economy is gaining more and more relevance in the companies around us. More and more companies are joining a system of production and use of technologies that are so necessary nowadays.

But what exactly is the circular economy? When we talk about circular economy, we refer to a model of both production and consumption that involves sharing, reusing, repairing, renewing and recycling existing materials and products as many times as possible to generate added value. This approach aims to extend the life and useful life of products, with the result that the life cycle of a product in a circular economy model differs significantly from the life cycle of a conventional product.

The circular economy seeks to maximise resource efficiency and minimise waste and pollution. Unlike the linear model of production and consumption, where resources are extracted, goods are produced and discarded, the circular economy seeks to close the cycle, creating a more sustainable system.

In the life cycle of a circular economy product, the selection stage of raw materials is considered as the starting point for establishing a sustainable production chain. The choice of components used to materialise the desired product is of utmost importance. In order to achieve a more circular production, various strategies can be implemented, such as the elimination of toxic compounds, the efficient use of energy, the use of renewable energy sources, the use of recycled and/or recyclable raw materials, the reduction of packaging and weight reduction, among other approaches. These strategies contribute to promoting the long and sustainable life cycle of products.

After knowing which materials and raw materials to work with, the design stage follows. and materialisation of ideas. This stage consists of incorporating and carrying out criteria for assessing the environmental impact of products throughout their life cycle, in order to improve their efficiency in the consumption of resources during the production process, including the use of secondary materials. In addition, the aim is to extend the useful life of products, facilitate their reuse and repair, and maximise the options for recycling the different components once they have reached the end of their useful life.

Thirdly, there is the production stage, a crucial stage in which there are several opportunities for companies to become more sustainable. To this end, within this approach, the main objectives are to reduce energy consumption, optimise the use of materials and reduce waste generation, among others.

The distribution stage is the next step in the circular economy process, and a fundamental step in continuing this sustainability chain, as it not only involves optimising transport from the point of production to the point of distribution or the end consumer, but also working on aspects such as packaging, which must be recyclable, reusable, made from recycled materials or designed to reduce weight/volume.

But what exactly is the circular economy? When we talk about circular economy, we refer to a model of both production and consumption that involves sharing, reusing, repairing, renewing and recycling existing materials and products as many times as possible to generate added value. This approach aims to extend the life and useful life of products, with the result that the life cycle of a product in a circular economy model differs significantly from the life cycle of a conventional product.

The circular economy seeks to maximise resource efficiency and minimise waste and pollution. Unlike the linear model of production and consumption, where resources are extracted, goods are produced and discarded, the circular economy seeks to close the cycle, creating a more sustainable system.

In the life cycle of a circular economy product, the selection stage of raw materials is considered as the starting point for establishing a sustainable production chain. The choice of components used to materialise the desired product is of utmost importance. In order to achieve a more circular production, various strategies can be implemented, such as the elimination of toxic compounds, the efficient use of energy, the use of renewable energy sources, the use of recycled and/or recyclable raw materials, the reduction of packaging and weight reduction, among other approaches. These strategies contribute to promoting the long and sustainable life cycle of products.

After knowing which materials and raw materials to work with, the design stage follows. and materialisation of ideas. This stage consists of incorporating and carrying out criteria for assessing the environmental impact of products throughout their life cycle, in order to improve their efficiency in the consumption of resources during the production process, including the use of secondary materials. In addition, the aim is to extend the useful life of products, facilitate their reuse and repair, and maximise the options for recycling the different components once they have reached the end of their useful life.

Thirdly, there is the production stage, a crucial stage in which there are several opportunities for companies to become more sustainable. To this end, within this approach, the main objectives are to reduce energy consumption, optimise the use of materials and reduce waste generation, among others.

The distribution stage is the next step in the circular economy process, and a fundamental step in continuing this sustainability chain, as it not only involves optimising transport from the point of production to the point of distribution or the end consumer, but also working on aspects such as packaging, which must be recyclable, reusable, made from recycled materials or designed to reduce weight/volume.

en_GB